U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor in Namibia 06-2010

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor in Namibia 06-2010
marriage counseling
Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor Namibian counterparts on HIV/AIDS counseling

By Rick Scavetta, U.S. Army Africa

VICENZA, Italy – When it comes to talking with military members and their families about facing terminal illness, the U.S. Army often relies upon the skills and training of its chaplains and enlisted chaplain’s assistants.

Recently, two U.S. Army Africa chaplains took their experience to Namibia, to share ideas with their counterparts within the Namibia Defence Force.

Lt. Col. Clyde Scott, U.S. Army Africa’s deputy command chaplain, and Maj. Allen Staley, plans and operations chaplain, spent a week in Windhoek, Namibia, where they led a seminar geared toward counseling military members and their families on the impact of HIV/AIDS. Twenty Namibians attended, to include five NDF chaplains, 14 NDF chaplain’s assistants and one prison chaplain.

“We covered numerous topics on the effects of dealing with AIDs related suffering and death,” Scott said. “It’s an important topic for chaplains to understand.”

The goal of the conference was to have Namibia’s chaplains discuss their roles in addressing HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention, Scott said.

It was also to have Namibia’s military take a closer look at the stigma caused by HIV/AIDS, ways to reduce discrimination, grief and trauma counseling and the importance of fidelity in marriages among Namibia’s diverse military.

The U.S. Army Africa chaplains provided their Namibian counterparts with materials and tools to use to create their own information events within their units and military communities. Discussions also focused on stress identification and management, post traumatic stress disorder, suicide awareness and spiritual resiliency.

“Namibian military chaplains are interested in strengthening their pastoral skills to deal with HIV/AIDS within their ranks,” Staley said. “They are eager to schedule follow up engagements to continue HIV/AIDS awareness education and find tools to better equip themselves in the fight against the disease.”

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor in Namibia 06-2010

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor in Namibia 06-2010
marriage counseling
Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor Namibian counterparts on HIV/AIDS counseling

By Rick Scavetta, U.S. Army Africa

VICENZA, Italy – When it comes to talking with military members and their families about facing terminal illness, the U.S. Army often relies upon the skills and training of its chaplains and enlisted chaplain’s assistants.

Recently, two U.S. Army Africa chaplains took their experience to Namibia, to share ideas with their counterparts within the Namibia Defence Force.

Lt. Col. Clyde Scott, U.S. Army Africa’s deputy command chaplain, and Maj. Allen Staley, plans and operations chaplain, spent a week in Windhoek, Namibia, where they led a seminar geared toward counseling military members and their families on the impact of HIV/AIDS. Twenty Namibians attended, to include five NDF chaplains, 14 NDF chaplain’s assistants and one prison chaplain.

“We covered numerous topics on the effects of dealing with AIDs related suffering and death,” Scott said. “It’s an important topic for chaplains to understand.”

The goal of the conference was to have Namibia’s chaplains discuss their roles in addressing HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention, Scott said.

It was also to have Namibia’s military take a closer look at the stigma caused by HIV/AIDS, ways to reduce discrimination, grief and trauma counseling and the importance of fidelity in marriages among Namibia’s diverse military.

The U.S. Army Africa chaplains provided their Namibian counterparts with materials and tools to use to create their own information events within their units and military communities. Discussions also focused on stress identification and management, post traumatic stress disorder, suicide awareness and spiritual resiliency.

“Namibian military chaplains are interested in strengthening their pastoral skills to deal with HIV/AIDS within their ranks,” Staley said. “They are eager to schedule follow up engagements to continue HIV/AIDS awareness education and find tools to better equip themselves in the fight against the disease.”

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

Germany vs South Africa 2:0 (Friendly, 5.9.2009)

How to donate for free, yes it`s true, please help. dear friend of nature, Eco-man gives to WWF for each person who signs up for a free seven days trial for Adult friend finder, this is your chance to donate 2minutes of your time and we pay for each sign up which is donated to WWF. please invite your friends to participate as every little helps. Love Peace Happiness. click the link to sign up for free trial getiton.adultfriendfinder.com this will cost you nothing just a few minutes please…… please…. please….. tell everybody, Power to the people!! check out our environmental site for more ways to save the planet. Many thanks from Eco-man. www.youtube.com calypsoworld.ws Questions: Why are we doing this? 1. to help the environment 2. satisfaction that a corporation is unwillingly donating money to help protect the environment. How does it work? 1. Adult Friend finder gives us for each new sign up, we donate that to WWF. What’s in it for us? 1. We recieved small bonuses for the number of signups per month, which we use to help promote this project. world cup, CR7, CR17, amazing goal, joga bonito, champions league, carling cup league cup, fa cup, skillz, freekick, penalty, bbc motd, skysports, setanta sports, itv sport, nike vapor, rooney, Cristiano ronaldo, tevez, giggs, scholes, alex ferguson, pfa player of the year, pfa young player of the year Cristiano ronaldo Arsenal, chelsea liverpool bolton, aston villa, birmingham, derby, newcastle, portsmouth
Video Rating: 0 / 5

New Zealand v South Africa

New Zealand v South Africa
• Hit the auto-update button for the latest. It might work today • Send your thoughts to rob.smyth@guardian.co.uk 14th over: South Africa 68-1 (target: 222, Smith 28, Kallis 33) The left-arm spinner Luke Woodcock, playing only his third ODI, comes on to bowl. His first ball is a nervous wide half-volley that Smith blitzes through extra cover for four, but the fourth is …
Read more on Guardian Unlimited

Weekend: Dionne Warwick to sing at Ritz
Scintillating, soothing and sensual best describe the familiar and legendary voice of five-time Grammy-winning music legend Dionne Warwick, who has become a cornerstone of American pop music and culture. She will perform at The Ritz Theatre in Tiffin at 7:30 p.m. April 9.
Read more on The Findlay Courier

Ball State Notes: Daily BSU athletics news
Ball State lost to Eastern Michigan 6-1 in a Mid-American Conference match. Kristel Sanders (No. 2 singles) won her match for the lone Ball State point.
Read more on The Star Press

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor in Namibia 06-2010

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor in Namibia 06-2010
marriage counseling
Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor Namibian counterparts on HIV/AIDS counseling

By Rick Scavetta, U.S. Army Africa

VICENZA, Italy – When it comes to talking with military members and their families about facing terminal illness, the U.S. Army often relies upon the skills and training of its chaplains and enlisted chaplain’s assistants.

Recently, two U.S. Army Africa chaplains took their experience to Namibia, to share ideas with their counterparts within the Namibia Defence Force.

Lt. Col. Clyde Scott, U.S. Army Africa’s deputy command chaplain, and Maj. Allen Staley, plans and operations chaplain, spent a week in Windhoek, Namibia, where they led a seminar geared toward counseling military members and their families on the impact of HIV/AIDS. Twenty Namibians attended, to include five NDF chaplains, 14 NDF chaplain’s assistants and one prison chaplain.

“We covered numerous topics on the effects of dealing with AIDs related suffering and death,” Scott said. “It’s an important topic for chaplains to understand.”

The goal of the conference was to have Namibia’s chaplains discuss their roles in addressing HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention, Scott said.

It was also to have Namibia’s military take a closer look at the stigma caused by HIV/AIDS, ways to reduce discrimination, grief and trauma counseling and the importance of fidelity in marriages among Namibia’s diverse military.

The U.S. Army Africa chaplains provided their Namibian counterparts with materials and tools to use to create their own information events within their units and military communities. Discussions also focused on stress identification and management, post traumatic stress disorder, suicide awareness and spiritual resiliency.

“Namibian military chaplains are interested in strengthening their pastoral skills to deal with HIV/AIDS within their ranks,” Staley said. “They are eager to schedule follow up engagements to continue HIV/AIDS awareness education and find tools to better equip themselves in the fight against the disease.”

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor in Namibia 06-2010

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor in Namibia 06-2010
marriage counseling
Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor Namibian counterparts on HIV/AIDS counseling

By Rick Scavetta, U.S. Army Africa

VICENZA, Italy – When it comes to talking with military members and their families about facing terminal illness, the U.S. Army often relies upon the skills and training of its chaplains and enlisted chaplain’s assistants.

Recently, two U.S. Army Africa chaplains took their experience to Namibia, to share ideas with their counterparts within the Namibia Defence Force.

Lt. Col. Clyde Scott, U.S. Army Africa’s deputy command chaplain, and Maj. Allen Staley, plans and operations chaplain, spent a week in Windhoek, Namibia, where they led a seminar geared toward counseling military members and their families on the impact of HIV/AIDS. Twenty Namibians attended, to include five NDF chaplains, 14 NDF chaplain’s assistants and one prison chaplain.

“We covered numerous topics on the effects of dealing with AIDs related suffering and death,” Scott said. “It’s an important topic for chaplains to understand.”

The goal of the conference was to have Namibia’s chaplains discuss their roles in addressing HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention, Scott said.

It was also to have Namibia’s military take a closer look at the stigma caused by HIV/AIDS, ways to reduce discrimination, grief and trauma counseling and the importance of fidelity in marriages among Namibia’s diverse military.

The U.S. Army Africa chaplains provided their Namibian counterparts with materials and tools to use to create their own information events within their units and military communities. Discussions also focused on stress identification and management, post traumatic stress disorder, suicide awareness and spiritual resiliency.

“Namibian military chaplains are interested in strengthening their pastoral skills to deal with HIV/AIDS within their ranks,” Staley said. “They are eager to schedule follow up engagements to continue HIV/AIDS awareness education and find tools to better equip themselves in the fight against the disease.”

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor in Namibia 06-2010

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor in Namibia 06-2010
marriage counseling
Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor Namibian counterparts on HIV/AIDS counseling

By Rick Scavetta, U.S. Army Africa

VICENZA, Italy – When it comes to talking with military members and their families about facing terminal illness, the U.S. Army often relies upon the skills and training of its chaplains and enlisted chaplain’s assistants.

Recently, two U.S. Army Africa chaplains took their experience to Namibia, to share ideas with their counterparts within the Namibia Defence Force.

Lt. Col. Clyde Scott, U.S. Army Africa’s deputy command chaplain, and Maj. Allen Staley, plans and operations chaplain, spent a week in Windhoek, Namibia, where they led a seminar geared toward counseling military members and their families on the impact of HIV/AIDS. Twenty Namibians attended, to include five NDF chaplains, 14 NDF chaplain’s assistants and one prison chaplain.

“We covered numerous topics on the effects of dealing with AIDs related suffering and death,” Scott said. “It’s an important topic for chaplains to understand.”

The goal of the conference was to have Namibia’s chaplains discuss their roles in addressing HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention, Scott said.

It was also to have Namibia’s military take a closer look at the stigma caused by HIV/AIDS, ways to reduce discrimination, grief and trauma counseling and the importance of fidelity in marriages among Namibia’s diverse military.

The U.S. Army Africa chaplains provided their Namibian counterparts with materials and tools to use to create their own information events within their units and military communities. Discussions also focused on stress identification and management, post traumatic stress disorder, suicide awareness and spiritual resiliency.

“Namibian military chaplains are interested in strengthening their pastoral skills to deal with HIV/AIDS within their ranks,” Staley said. “They are eager to schedule follow up engagements to continue HIV/AIDS awareness education and find tools to better equip themselves in the fight against the disease.”

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor in Namibia 06-2010

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor in Namibia 06-2010
marriage counseling
Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor Namibian counterparts on HIV/AIDS counseling

By Rick Scavetta, U.S. Army Africa

VICENZA, Italy – When it comes to talking with military members and their families about facing terminal illness, the U.S. Army often relies upon the skills and training of its chaplains and enlisted chaplain’s assistants.

Recently, two U.S. Army Africa chaplains took their experience to Namibia, to share ideas with their counterparts within the Namibia Defence Force.

Lt. Col. Clyde Scott, U.S. Army Africa’s deputy command chaplain, and Maj. Allen Staley, plans and operations chaplain, spent a week in Windhoek, Namibia, where they led a seminar geared toward counseling military members and their families on the impact of HIV/AIDS. Twenty Namibians attended, to include five NDF chaplains, 14 NDF chaplain’s assistants and one prison chaplain.

“We covered numerous topics on the effects of dealing with AIDs related suffering and death,” Scott said. “It’s an important topic for chaplains to understand.”

The goal of the conference was to have Namibia’s chaplains discuss their roles in addressing HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention, Scott said.

It was also to have Namibia’s military take a closer look at the stigma caused by HIV/AIDS, ways to reduce discrimination, grief and trauma counseling and the importance of fidelity in marriages among Namibia’s diverse military.

The U.S. Army Africa chaplains provided their Namibian counterparts with materials and tools to use to create their own information events within their units and military communities. Discussions also focused on stress identification and management, post traumatic stress disorder, suicide awareness and spiritual resiliency.

“Namibian military chaplains are interested in strengthening their pastoral skills to deal with HIV/AIDS within their ranks,” Staley said. “They are eager to schedule follow up engagements to continue HIV/AIDS awareness education and find tools to better equip themselves in the fight against the disease.”

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor in Namibia 06-2010

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor in Namibia 06-2010
marriage counseling
Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor Namibian counterparts on HIV/AIDS counseling

By Rick Scavetta, U.S. Army Africa

VICENZA, Italy – When it comes to talking with military members and their families about facing terminal illness, the U.S. Army often relies upon the skills and training of its chaplains and enlisted chaplain’s assistants.

Recently, two U.S. Army Africa chaplains took their experience to Namibia, to share ideas with their counterparts within the Namibia Defence Force.

Lt. Col. Clyde Scott, U.S. Army Africa’s deputy command chaplain, and Maj. Allen Staley, plans and operations chaplain, spent a week in Windhoek, Namibia, where they led a seminar geared toward counseling military members and their families on the impact of HIV/AIDS. Twenty Namibians attended, to include five NDF chaplains, 14 NDF chaplain’s assistants and one prison chaplain.

“We covered numerous topics on the effects of dealing with AIDs related suffering and death,” Scott said. “It’s an important topic for chaplains to understand.”

The goal of the conference was to have Namibia’s chaplains discuss their roles in addressing HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention, Scott said.

It was also to have Namibia’s military take a closer look at the stigma caused by HIV/AIDS, ways to reduce discrimination, grief and trauma counseling and the importance of fidelity in marriages among Namibia’s diverse military.

The U.S. Army Africa chaplains provided their Namibian counterparts with materials and tools to use to create their own information events within their units and military communities. Discussions also focused on stress identification and management, post traumatic stress disorder, suicide awareness and spiritual resiliency.

“Namibian military chaplains are interested in strengthening their pastoral skills to deal with HIV/AIDS within their ranks,” Staley said. “They are eager to schedule follow up engagements to continue HIV/AIDS awareness education and find tools to better equip themselves in the fight against the disease.”

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor in Namibia 06-2010

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor in Namibia 06-2010
marriage counseling
Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

U.S. Army Africa chaplains mentor Namibian counterparts on HIV/AIDS counseling

By Rick Scavetta, U.S. Army Africa

VICENZA, Italy – When it comes to talking with military members and their families about facing terminal illness, the U.S. Army often relies upon the skills and training of its chaplains and enlisted chaplain’s assistants.

Recently, two U.S. Army Africa chaplains took their experience to Namibia, to share ideas with their counterparts within the Namibia Defence Force.

Lt. Col. Clyde Scott, U.S. Army Africa’s deputy command chaplain, and Maj. Allen Staley, plans and operations chaplain, spent a week in Windhoek, Namibia, where they led a seminar geared toward counseling military members and their families on the impact of HIV/AIDS. Twenty Namibians attended, to include five NDF chaplains, 14 NDF chaplain’s assistants and one prison chaplain.

“We covered numerous topics on the effects of dealing with AIDs related suffering and death,” Scott said. “It’s an important topic for chaplains to understand.”

The goal of the conference was to have Namibia’s chaplains discuss their roles in addressing HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention, Scott said.

It was also to have Namibia’s military take a closer look at the stigma caused by HIV/AIDS, ways to reduce discrimination, grief and trauma counseling and the importance of fidelity in marriages among Namibia’s diverse military.

The U.S. Army Africa chaplains provided their Namibian counterparts with materials and tools to use to create their own information events within their units and military communities. Discussions also focused on stress identification and management, post traumatic stress disorder, suicide awareness and spiritual resiliency.

“Namibian military chaplains are interested in strengthening their pastoral skills to deal with HIV/AIDS within their ranks,” Staley said. “They are eager to schedule follow up engagements to continue HIV/AIDS awareness education and find tools to better equip themselves in the fight against the disease.”

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica