Malvina Hoffman, American sculptor 1885-1966 (at right), and Anne Morgan, philanthropist, standing in front of relief of St. Francis of Assisi.

Malvina Hoffman, American sculptor 1885-1966 (at right), and Anne Morgan, philanthropist, standing in front of relief of St. Francis of Assisi.
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Image by Smithsonian Institution
Description: Malvina Hoffman is best known for her commission to sculpt a head of each race of man by the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. She spent 5 years traveling the world, getting frostbite on the island of Hokkaido modeling Ainu tribe members and adventuring in the jungles of Bali where she sculpted the lovely temple dancers. In all, over 100 ethnographic types were sculpted for the installation called the Hall of Man. She had a gift for capturing the essence of movement in her other works and specialized in sculptures of dancers as well. Outside of art, she was passionate about seeking aid for refugees, and worked for Yugoslavian relief after World War I.

Creator/Photographer: Peter A. Juley & Son

Medium: Black and white photographic print

Dimensions: 8 in x 10 in

Culture: American

Date: 1930

Persistent URL: http://photography.si.edu/SearchImage.aspx?id=5826

Repository: Smithsonian American Art Museum, Photograph Archives

Collection: Peter A. Juley & Son Collection – The Peter A. Juley & Son Collection is comprised of 127,000 black-and-white photographic negatives documenting the works of more than 11,000 American artists. Throughout its long history, from 1896 to 1975, the Juley firm served as the largest and most respected fine arts photography firm in New York. The Juley Collection, acquired by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in 1975, constitutes a unique visual record of American art sometimes providing the only photographic documentation of altered, damaged, or lost works. Included in the collection are over 4,700 photographic portraits of artists.

Accession number: J0001710